Omelette Arnold Bennett
This famous dish was created by Jean Baptiste Virlogeux, a chef at the Savoy for British novelist Arnold Bennett during his stay while researching the second of two books he set in the hotel. It has been on the menu there ever since.
Omelette Arnold Bennett
This famous dish was created by Jean Baptiste Virlogeux, a chef at the Savoy for British novelist Arnold Bennett during his stay while researching the second of two books he set in the hotel. It has been on the menu there ever since.
Servings
2
Servings
2
Ingredients
Instructions
  1. Prepare the fish: Mix the milk with all but 2 tbsp. of the cream, pour it into a large shallow pan and bring to the boil. Add the bay leaf, onion, nutmeg and peppercorns, and bring to the boil. Add the smoked haddock, bring back to a gentle simmer and poach for 3-4 minutes, until the fish is just cooked. Lift the fish out onto a plate and leave until cool enough to handle, then break it into large flakes, discarding the skin.
  2. Make the sauce: Melt 1/2 the butter in a small pan over medium-low heat, then whisk in the flour. Cook for a couple of minutes, then gradually whisk in the fish poaching liquid and cook until it thickens. Take off the heat. Whisk the egg yolks with the remaining cream, then very gradually whisk into the sauce. Stir in the fish and season to taste.
  3. Pre-heat your broiler/grill to high.
  4. Make the omelette: Whisk the eggs together a bit of seasoning, but go lightly on the salt. Heat a small non-stick frying or omelette pan over a medium heat, then add the remaining butter and swirl it around to coat the base and sides of the pan. Pour in the eggs and, as they start to set, drag the back of a fork over the base of the pan, lifting up little folds of egg to allow the uncooked egg to run underneath.
  5. Finish the dish: When the omelette is set underneath but still very moist on top, remove from the stove. Spoon on the sauce, add the Parmesan cheese, then put the omelette under the hot grill until lightly golden brown.
  6. I like to divide the omelette into quarters, plate, then serve.
Recipe Notes

This dish was not created until 1929 so perhaps we might see it served in a future Downton movie.
I enjoy the connection of this dish to the final episode of Downton. The Savoy once boasted the talent of Chef great Auguste Escoffier (who founded the school where Albert trained) and Cesar Ritz, who found The Ritz, where Edith and Bertie rekindled their love in the final episode.

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