Unsweetened Applesauce
While applesauce is great on pork dishes, I do a lot of low fat baking and often using applesauce to replace oil in baked goods. You could buy it in the store, but it is simple to make and fills your home with lovely smells.
Unsweetened Applesauce
While applesauce is great on pork dishes, I do a lot of low fat baking and often using applesauce to replace oil in baked goods. You could buy it in the store, but it is simple to make and fills your home with lovely smells.
Servings Prep Time
6cups 20minutes
Cook Time
30 minutes
Servings Prep Time
6cups 20minutes
Cook Time
30 minutes
Ingredients
Instructions
  1. Peel, core and chop all the apples.Put the apples into a large stock pot or dutch oven. Add about a 1/4 cup of water into the pot to prevent burning. Add the cinnamon sticks, lemon juice.
  2. Use low-medium heat on your stove and reduce the apples down to what looks like applesauce. It should take about an hour.
  3. Mrs. Patmore would have used a potato masher to finish the sauce to break up any large lumps. Today you are permitted to the modern day version called an an immersion blender or to put the sauce through a blender.
Recipe Notes

What Mrs. Patmore would say to do with all the apples you brought home from the apple orchard, or those bruised apples from the grocer is to make lovely desserts, which can be enjoyed now, and put up applesauce to store for the long winter. Downton Abbey, like most grand country homes had their own orchards so fruit was plentiful.

This recipe makes quite a bit of applesauce.  If you are a bit of a Daisy when it comes to canning, applesauce freezes really well flat in freezer bags or you can use low profile plastic containers.

Apples could be used in the famous apple charlotte, apple crumble, or a lovely apple pie. Try this great recipe for pie pastry which will make multiple pies from all those apples. Apples will store well in a cool larder (pantry), but cooks in the era would also make applesauce to serve with pork dishes, duck and of course, the Christmas goose. For many generations of cooks, canning was a necessity for preserving food for long term storage. Particularly during and after wartime*, it was necessary to be able to extend the use of your preserves.

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